• Are there any additives or fillers in your burger patties and sausages?: Absolutely not! We pride ourselves on selling only our products in their true state with no use of artificial flours or preservatives.
  • How long can processed meats last in the fridge?: Because we do not use any preservatives in our processed meats, they are only good for about 3 days in the fridge and 3 months in the freezer.
  • How long is your meat good for?: At the Artisan Butchery, we offer vacuum-sealed plastic packaging which allows meat to last approximately 12 months in your freezer. If this packaging is kept in your fridge and sealed air-tight, it can be kept for up to approximately 10 days.
  • Is your meat delivered fresh or frozen?: Most of our meat is delivered fresh from our suppliers except chicken.
  • What is the best way to defrost meat?: We recommend that you plan your meal at least two days in advance so that you can let the meat thaw out in your fridge, as opposed to more rapidly on the counter. There is always potential for meat to create bacteria growth when defrosted at room-temperature.
  • Can you make a special or custom cut for me?: Absolutely. And if you are fairly unfamiliar with cuts of meat, feel free to bring in your cookbook and show any of our qualified butchers. They will be happy to give you some guidance, as well as tips on how to cook any cut properly! ** which meats should be cooked rare and which should be well done?** Any tender beef such as sirloin, prime rib, ribeye, tenderloin, and striploin could be cooked medium-rare or rare. Tougher cuts of beef such as blade, cross rib, and inside or outside round need to be cooked well done. This should be done slowly and at a lower temperature to help break down the muscle tissue and increase the tenderness of the meat.
  • Why is my ground beef dark in the middle when I break it up to cook?: This is an incredibly common question, to be honest! This darkening is not because of a machine or any kind of processing, it is a natural phenomenon. When the muscle is fresh before grinding, the natural color is somewhat purple. But when it is exposed to the air, the oxygen causes the blood on the muscle to surface, oxidize, and turn red – in the meat industry, this is known as “blooming”. This means that every little piece of ground meat is red by the time it is packaged. But when some time goes by, the surface of the meat that is not exposed to air anymore tries to revert back to it’s original state. In a sense, the oxidization process reverses! This results in the inside meat becoming darker, while the surface meat remains red.